Abstractions in Photography

Abstractions in Photography

Tuesday, June 9, 2015,
6:00PM to 9:00PM
$ 70.00 CAD
$ 60.00 CAD
Focusing on critical theories and ideas that shape photographic practice, this workshop investigates the (relatively) recent turn to abstraction in photography. Since its invention in 1839, photography has been defined by its mimetic function: it cannot help but represent something else. It seems impossible for us to analyze or even “see” a photograph without seeing the thing or person it represents. By surveying works by contemporary artists that test the limits of figuration in photography, and reading texts that propose an alternate role for photography outside of representation, this workshop considers the idea of abstraction in contemporary photography. In so doing, it asks us to slow down and to re-examine the possibilities of analogue photography that we may have missed in our rush to digitization, and to think about the materiality of photography by evacuating the subject from the photograph’s representational function. Participants are encouraged to bring work in progress on this topic.
Instructor(s): 
Gabrielle Moser is writer, educator and independent curator based in Toronto. She organizes exhibitions and events about photography, spectatorship and pedagogy and currently runs No Looking After the Internet, a monthly, out-loud looking group. As an independent curator, she has organized exhibitions for Access Gallery, Gallery TPW, Vtape and Xpace. Her writing appears in venues including Artforum.com, Art in America, Canadian Art, Fillip, Journal of Visual Culture, Photography & Culture and the Gallery 44/Ryerson University volume, Emergence: Contemporary Photography in Canada. She holds a PhD from the art history and visual culture program at York University in Toronto, Canada and teaches at OCAD University.